LESS THAN TWO WEEKS UNTIL THE EVENT

We are attending to all the details of our fundraiser as we count down just a few more days until our June 1st event. I spoke with Captain Harry while at sea just the other day and he reports, "Everyone can't wait until we get to Hawaii!" Excitement is brewing aboard the BEAR. I know there are many families here in Hawaii that can't wait until the ship's arrival, too! Come on down to Aloha Tower on Wednesday the 30th. Meet the ship as it docks around 1530 (3:30 PM).

Our 2016 scholarship recipient Duke Quitevas, working on his sail bag creation while on the training cruise headed to Hawaii.

Our 2016 scholarship recipient Duke Quitevas, working on his sail bag creation while on the training cruise headed to Hawaii.

GOLDEN BEAR ARRIVING INTO HAWAII EARLY!

I received word directly from Capt. Harry Bolton that the T/S GOLDEN BEAR is arriving into Hawaii a bit early. She will be at the Honolulu Pilot Station on WEDNESDAY MAY 30TH AT 1500 (3:00 PM). The ship will be docking at the makai side of Aloha Tower complex, on Pier 9. The public will have access and be allowed on the pier when the ship arrives. This is an 'open' area to the public which is easily accessed by simply walking through the Aloha Tower/HPU complex or along pier 8 on the Diamond Head side, adjacent to Nashville Waikiki and Hooters. No ID is required.

For those on Maui, the T/S GOLDEN BEAR WILL ANCHOR OFF LAHAINA THE EVENING OF MAY 22ND. They remain at anchor in the Lahaina Roadstead until May 26th when they get underway at 0800 for sea. The BEAR typically remians slow steaming off the lee of Maui doing drills and maneuvering exercises until she heads for her Honolulu arrival.

TRAINING SHIP GOLDEN BEAR ON HER WAY TO HAWAII

The T/S GOLDEN BEAR departed El Salvador and is on her way to Hawaii. Next stop, Lahaina, Maui on May 23. Not certain of schedule once the ship arrives. Sometimes they do drills and 'rubber docking' maneuvers. At some point, they may anchor and allow cadets ashore. Standby for more info.

The T/S GOLDEN BEAR departed El Salvador and is on her way to Hawaii. Next stop, Lahaina, Maui on May 23. Not certain of schedule once the ship arrives. Sometimes they do drills and 'rubber docking' maneuvers. At some point, they may anchor and allow cadets ashore. Standby for more info.

UPDATE ON EVENT SPONSORS

OUR FRIENDS AT FOSS / YOUNG BROTHERS HAVE PARTNERED UP WITH EACH OTHER TO PURCHASE A 'PILOTS TABLE'. AWESOME SUPPORT FROM A COMPANY WHERE MANY CAL MARITIME GRADUATES ARE CURRENTLY EMPLOYED BOTH ASHORE AND AT SEA. OF COURSE THE MEMBERS OF THE HAWAII PILOT ASSOCIATION ARE ALL IN, TOO! P&M SERVICES ARE ONCE AGAIN SUPPORTING OUR EFFORT TO ASSIST YOUNG LOCAL CADETS FROM HAWAII. 

PASHA Hawaii Commits to Lyman Scholarship Event...again!

Another one of our great corporate sponsors over the years has committed again to a CAPTAIN'S TABLE at our fundraising event. Our good friend Darren Lee stopped by the Pilot's office and dropped off a check from PASHA. Always glad to see them at our waterfront get together. You never know who might drop in from the mainland office!? PASHA's two ships running from the West Coast to Hawaii also have several Cal Maritime alumni aboard in the deck and engine departments. They also routinely have cadets onboard. We look forward to seeing some (we hope) CMA cadets on the JEAN ANNE or the MARJORIE C.

LYMAN SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT GYLE MCGURN FEATURED IN VOYAGE BLOG

One of the primary challenges for deck cadets on the training cruise each year is to put into practice the navigational skills that they all learn in class from books and written computational exercises. The skill of navigating at sea using a sextant is part "art-form" and can be challenging. Even for those students who may easily grasp the mathematics of sight reduction into an actual position on a chart. Standing on the deck of a vessel at sea that is rolling, heaving, and pitching in a seaway and using a sextant to 'bring a star down to the horizon' as seen through a scope, requires patience. It doesn't matter how well you can calculate the numbers if your sight is off from simply doing a bad job of it. I'm sure most all deck graduates will tell you that one skill that is learned at Cal Maritime is how to "shoot stars" and do it well, repeatedly. This component of going on the training cruise can be very challenging for the deck cadet's curriculum. But the navigational skills obtained last a professional lifetime.

1st Class Cadet Gyle McGurn seen here in the Navigation Lab calculating star time for sights later that night. McGurn is a Lyman Scholarship recipient. Gyle McGurn, a resident of Maui, is seated on far left.

1st Class Cadet Gyle McGurn seen here in the Navigation Lab calculating star time for sights later that night. McGurn is a Lyman Scholarship recipient. Gyle McGurn, a resident of Maui, is seated on far left.

MATSON "TOP SPONSOR" FOR 2017 DAVE LYMAN FUNDRAISING EVENT

A big mahalo to MATSON for stepping up first to donate this year to our 2017 fundraising campaign. Senior Vice-President of the Pacific Region, Mr. Vic Angoco said, "We're always glad to support!" Indeed! Matson has been a huge supporter of our DAVE LYMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND since inception back in 2007. With many Cal Maritime alumni employed aboard Matson ships and shoreside at numerous terminals on the west coast and in Hawaii, it only makes sense for Matson to continue providing kokua and support to the Lyman Scholarship Fund.  Linda Howe, Matson Manager for Community Relations, recently delivered a check for $6000 to purchase a PILOT's TABLE at the upcoming June 1st event.